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Pros and Cons of Visual Studio Code vs. Sublime Text 3


Pros and Cons of Visual Studio Code vs. Sublime Text 3

Below are personal observations with the VS Code editor as compared to the Sublime Text editor.
VS Code: A lightweight IDE
Sublime Text: A customizable code editor

VS Code: Pro and Cons

  • Pro: TypeScript insights are excellent (ST3 insights don't work well at all).
  • Pro: Referential integrity.
  • Con: Bracket-matching cursor sucks, no matter which option I choose. The small thick underscore gave me the least headache, but eventually had to turn them off completely.
  • Con: Pg-Up and Pg-Down scroll the cursor, not the page (inconsistent with most other apps).
  • Con: Insert (overwrite) doesn't work.
  • Con: Can never remember the recent files I actually need; even when just closed.
  • Con: File menu isn't native (no keyboard left/right menu switching).

Results

Use VS Code for my React + TypeScript projects; for its TypeScript insights. Use ST3 for everything else due to its lightweightedness and more consistent keyboard input.

History

Reference: Personal notes [ shared as Gist ]
2018-02-12 - Monday @7:40 PM
 Was staring/analyzing my memory consumption, and it hit me...
 Why am I using VS Code to write a Chrome extension...?
 Dropped it and went back to Sublime Text 3.

System / RAM

MSI: Windows 10 x64 i7; 16 GB RAM
  • VS Code: Running idle at 265 MB (1 file open; 730 loc; was running up to between 580 MB and 600+).
  • ST3: Running at 135 MB (10 files open).
  • MWB hovers around 140 MB.

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