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Expired To Be: A Chrome Browser Extension

Expired To Be

A Chrome Browser Extension

Set and be reminded of expiration dates.

'Expired To Be' is a Chrome extension available on the Chrome Web Store.

Get notified of expiring items for things you don't think about too often; like butter, medicine, or the supplies under your sink.

As a developer, I spend most of my life in Chrome, which is why I decided to create this app as a browser extension. This was my 2nd Chrome Extension (the first being "Character Counts", which I wrote as my Final Project in Harvard's CS50 course).

Although I built the extension primarily for personal use, I also wrote it for continued JavaScript practice: It is open source on GitHub, and I'm completely open to feedback as well as PRs. And I'm especially open to looking into any bugs.

Development time took just over 2 weeks. This was one of my more tedious projects I've worked on in awhile (migrations with Laravel, Nov 2016, actually), but then I was a tad sick through part of it as well (I know, excuses, excuses!). I also delved into about a half dozen development areas I'd not touched much, or at all, prior. Complete development history details provided on GitHub.

I might make a SPA version, if I find myself needing one, or perhaps if there were outside interest. Creating a FireFox extension would make for a good fork and school or side project for someone.

Expired To Be: Chrome Web Store: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/expired-to-be/kamjiblbgmiobifooelpmlkojmadmcan

GitHub: Expired To Be: https://github.com/KDCinfo/expired-to-be

GitHub: Character Counts: https://github.com/KDCinfo/character-counts

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